1123 Recetas de 47 Países con 380 Traducciones por 52 Traductores en 17 Idiomas
Pão de queijo (pan de queso brasileño)
Br
Receta Destacada, Jul 09 2013

El Equipo de CookMap.com

Cómo prepararlo

  1. Paso 1

    Rallar el queso u reservar. Tradicionalmente, se prepara con meia cura, pero también se puede hacer con mozzarella. Lo importante es tener un queso firme y salado y que se derrita fácil.

    Rallar el queso u reservar. Tradicionalmente, se prepara con meia cura, pero también se puede hacer con mozzarella. Lo importante es tener un queso firme y salado y que se derrita fácil.

  2. Paso 2

    Poner agua, leche, aceite y sal en una olla y cocinar a fuego medio hasta que la mezcla empiece a hervir (se va a hacer espuma).

    Poner agua, leche, aceite y sal en una olla y cocinar a fuego medio hasta que la mezcla empiece a hervir (se va a hacer espuma).

  3. Paso 3

    Medir dos tazas del almidón en un tazón mediano y echar a la mezcla caliente de leche. Mezclar bien.

    Medir dos tazas del almidón en un tazón mediano y echar a la mezcla caliente de leche. Mezclar bien.

  4. Paso 4

    Así debe quedar luego de combinar los líquidos y el almidón. Es un poco difícil incorporar los ingredientes y la textura parece rara. ¡No te preocupes!

    Así debe quedar luego de combinar los líquidos y el almidón. Es un poco difícil incorporar los ingredientes y la textura parece rara. ¡No te preocupes!

  5. Paso 5

    En otro tazón, combinar el queso y los huevos.

    En otro tazón, combinar el queso y los huevos.

  6. Paso 6

    Agregar los huevos y el queso a la pasta. Es difícil de mezclar, pero ten en mente que la masa debe quedar suave.

    Agregar los huevos y el queso a la pasta. Es difícil de mezclar, pero ten en mente que la masa debe quedar suave.

  7. Paso 7

    Sacar la masa con una cuchara a un molde para hornear en porciones de una cucharada cada uno. Deja 4 cm entre uno y otro. Mete al horno a 180°C (temperatura media) durante 30 a 40 minutos. Puedes dejarlo 5 minutos más para que esté más tostado y más crocante.

    Sacar la masa con una cuchara a un molde para hornear en porciones de una cucharada cada uno. Deja 4 cm entre uno y otro. Mete al horno a 180°C (temperatura media) durante 30 a 40 minutos. Puedes dejarlo 5 minutos más para que esté más tostado y más crocante.

  8. Paso 8

    ¡Listo!

    ¡Listo!

Comentarios

  • Miles

    Miles Fantastic pictures! Look so good I'm trying to imagine the taste... I really need to make these :)

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hey Miles, thanks :)
    When you try the recipe, let me know how did it go. They are addicting!
    Plus, you can freeze the unbaked batter (already separated in one-tablespoon portions) and save it for later.

    hace más de 6 años
  • Felice

    Felice Wow, you're pictures are super! I have my eye on this recipe too ;) Can't wait to try!

    Just wondering, can you substitute tapioca starch for anything else or is it basically a 'must'? I can probably find it, but just curious since I've never used it or seen it!

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi Felice.
    Now, that's a good question!
    I have only used cassava starch, because it's the usual ingredient and it can be easily found anywhere in Brazil. But it would be nice to experiment with other alternatives, I don't know how the pães de queijo would come out.
    What other starch you have around that is more accessible?

    hace más de 6 años
  • Felice

    Felice Just checked the local store, but the only starch available is corn starch... I have a feeling that wouldn't be so great, hehe. Shouldn't have a problem finding it when I go to a bigger city though!

    hace más de 6 años
  • Miles

    Miles I did a bit of checking and it seems potato starch (not flour) or corn starch are typical substitutions for tapioca starch. will try and let you know :)

    hace más de 6 años
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Am sure you could make this even with regular flour?

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi Jens. I'm not sure, but I believe the texture would come out weird. You see, the gluten in the regular wheat flour would probably make them stickier
    Anyway, I'm not sure, and it is all a matter of experimenting with what's on hand. We might discover some great unexpected results.
    Thanks Miles for your research :)

    hace más de 6 años
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Good point! How about rice flour? Lots of testing to be done ;-)

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Seems like I'll have to invite some friends over and start the testing Jens! :)

    hace más de 6 años
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Please do! ;-) I'll try and see If I can try the recipe out this weekend.

    hace más de 6 años
  • Felice

    Felice International cooking experiment? All 4 of us can try a different kind of flour ;P

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Agreed. Which ones do you guys have on hand?

    hace más de 6 años
  • Miles

    Miles Oh. I already tried with corn starch!

    hace más de 6 años
  • Felice

    Felice I have regular and wheat flour. Miles did corn starch already, so what else can we try with? What about 'katakuriko' starch over there in Japan (I think it's potato starch)?

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Ok, so, corn and tapioca starch: check!
    These are the ones I would find more easily around here.
    We have potato starch and all purpose flour to try, any other kind of starch is usual and might be an option where you guys live?
    Felice, when you say wheat flour, what's the difference between that and all purpose?
    I could try rice flour.

    hace más de 6 años
  • Felice

    Felice Oh, I meant whole wheat flour (sorry!). I also have rye flour by the way, but it's rather rough. If I'm up in the 'big city' I have almost any option available, but I can't remember exactly. I'll have to check next time I'm there!

    For now, I could try a mix of whole wheat and regular flour...sounds like it would be tasty. I wonder if it would need a bit of baking powder? hmm

    hace más de 6 años
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Please also let us know how they turn out with potato starch - this is widely available in japan as "Katakuriko" - Thanks!

    hace más de 6 años
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi guys, did you get around to experimenting with the flours and starches?
    I finally tried rice flour the other day, but it didn't seem like pão de queijo at all. They were all right, I guess. But very different from the expected result: rather crumbly and cakey, kind of dry. And even though I used the same cheese, they did not come out as flavoursome as in the original recipe.

    hace más de 5 años
  • Miles

    Miles Hi Flora! Yes, I made these with corn starch. They were very tasty but definitely not as light and fluffy as yours looked in the recipe photo. Maybe sounds a bit like your experience with rice flour. More of a 'cakey' texture

    hace más de 5 años
  • Felice

    Felice Hi Flora! Actually, I did not get to try them with other flours besides tapioca yet! Thanks for reminding me - the first time I made this recipe it was so good, so I'd love to eat pao de queijo again. I have a feeling that potato starch might work okay. Will report soon ;)

    hace más de 5 años
  • Felice

    Felice Just made these with Potato starch/katakuriko yesterday and it worked great! Posted the photo above ;)

    hace más de 5 años
Comment_tail