WE NEED YOUR HELP!

CookMap.com is 70% translated into Português so far! If you want to help people all over the world enjoy authentic recipes in Português, check out our translation project and help us fully support this language :)

Pão de queijo.
Br
Receita destacada, Jul 09 2013

The CookMap.com Team

Como cozinhar

  1. Etapa 1

    Ralei o queijo na parte grossa do ralador e reservei.
O tradicional é usar meia-cura, mas já preparei com mussarela, com queijo de colônia, e também ficou bom. O importante é usar uma variedade que seja firme, que seja salgada, e que fique gostoso derretido).

    Ralei o queijo na parte grossa do ralador e reservei.
    O tradicional é usar meia-cura, mas já preparei com mussarela, com queijo de colônia, e também ficou bom. O importante é usar uma variedade que seja firme, que seja salgada, e que fique gostoso derretido).

  2. Etapa 2

    Coloquei água, leite, óleo e sal em uma panela e deixei aquecer sobre fogo médio até começar a ferver (a mistura começa a espumar quando ferve).

    Coloquei água, leite, óleo e sal em uma panela e deixei aquecer sobre fogo médio até começar a ferver (a mistura começa a espumar quando ferve).

  3. Etapa 3

    Medi a duas xícaras de polvilho e coloquei em uma tigela média, despejei a mistura fervente de leite por cima e misturei muito bem.

    Medi a duas xícaras de polvilho e coloquei em uma tigela média, despejei a mistura fervente de leite por cima e misturei muito bem.

  4. Etapa 4

    Esta é a aparência depois de misturar os líquidos com o polvilho.
É um pouco difícil de misturar e a textura fica estranha, não se preocupe.

    Esta é a aparência depois de misturar os líquidos com o polvilho.
    É um pouco difícil de misturar e a textura fica estranha, não se preocupe.

  5. Etapa 5

    Em uma tigela à parte, misturei os ovos ao queijo.

    Em uma tigela à parte, misturei os ovos ao queijo.

  6. Etapa 6

    Adicionei os ovos e queijo ao restante da massa. De novo, é difícil de misturar. Mas precisa ficar homogêneo.

    Adicionei os ovos e queijo ao restante da massa. De novo, é difícil de misturar. Mas precisa ficar homogêneo.

  7. Etapa 7

    Transferi a massa às colheradas para uma assadeira (não precisa untar), deixando 4cm de espaço entre um pãozinho e outro.
Assei em forno pré-aquecido a 180oC (temperatura média) por 30 ou 40 minutos.
Se quiser, pode deixar por mais 5 minutos para que fiquem mais crocantes e escuros por fora.

    Transferi a massa às colheradas para uma assadeira (não precisa untar), deixando 4cm de espaço entre um pãozinho e outro.
    Assei em forno pré-aquecido a 180oC (temperatura média) por 30 ou 40 minutos.
    Se quiser, pode deixar por mais 5 minutos para que fiquem mais crocantes e escuros por fora.

  8. Etapa 8

    Pronto!

    Pronto!

Comentários

  • Miles

    Miles Fantastic pictures! Look so good I'm trying to imagine the taste... I really need to make these :)

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hey Miles, thanks :)
    When you try the recipe, let me know how did it go. They are addicting!
    Plus, you can freeze the unbaked batter (already separated in one-tablespoon portions) and save it for later.

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice Wow, you're pictures are super! I have my eye on this recipe too ;) Can't wait to try!

    Just wondering, can you substitute tapioca starch for anything else or is it basically a 'must'? I can probably find it, but just curious since I've never used it or seen it!

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi Felice.
    Now, that's a good question!
    I have only used cassava starch, because it's the usual ingredient and it can be easily found anywhere in Brazil. But it would be nice to experiment with other alternatives, I don't know how the pães de queijo would come out.
    What other starch you have around that is more accessible?

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice Just checked the local store, but the only starch available is corn starch... I have a feeling that wouldn't be so great, hehe. Shouldn't have a problem finding it when I go to a bigger city though!

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Miles

    Miles I did a bit of checking and it seems potato starch (not flour) or corn starch are typical substitutions for tapioca starch. will try and let you know :)

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Am sure you could make this even with regular flour?

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi Jens. I'm not sure, but I believe the texture would come out weird. You see, the gluten in the regular wheat flour would probably make them stickier
    Anyway, I'm not sure, and it is all a matter of experimenting with what's on hand. We might discover some great unexpected results.
    Thanks Miles for your research :)

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Good point! How about rice flour? Lots of testing to be done ;-)

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Seems like I'll have to invite some friends over and start the testing Jens! :)

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Please do! ;-) I'll try and see If I can try the recipe out this weekend.

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice International cooking experiment? All 4 of us can try a different kind of flour ;P

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Agreed. Which ones do you guys have on hand?

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Miles

    Miles Oh. I already tried with corn starch!

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice I have regular and wheat flour. Miles did corn starch already, so what else can we try with? What about 'katakuriko' starch over there in Japan (I think it's potato starch)?

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Ok, so, corn and tapioca starch: check!
    These are the ones I would find more easily around here.
    We have potato starch and all purpose flour to try, any other kind of starch is usual and might be an option where you guys live?
    Felice, when you say wheat flour, what's the difference between that and all purpose?
    I could try rice flour.

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice Oh, I meant whole wheat flour (sorry!). I also have rye flour by the way, but it's rather rough. If I'm up in the 'big city' I have almost any option available, but I can't remember exactly. I'll have to check next time I'm there!

    For now, I could try a mix of whole wheat and regular flour...sounds like it would be tasty. I wonder if it would need a bit of baking powder? hmm

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Jens H. Jensen

    Jens H. Jensen Please also let us know how they turn out with potato starch - this is widely available in japan as "Katakuriko" - Thanks!

    mais de 4 anos atrás
  • Flora Refosco

    Flora Refosco Hi guys, did you get around to experimenting with the flours and starches?
    I finally tried rice flour the other day, but it didn't seem like pão de queijo at all. They were all right, I guess. But very different from the expected result: rather crumbly and cakey, kind of dry. And even though I used the same cheese, they did not come out as flavoursome as in the original recipe.

    mais de 3 anos atrás
  • Miles

    Miles Hi Flora! Yes, I made these with corn starch. They were very tasty but definitely not as light and fluffy as yours looked in the recipe photo. Maybe sounds a bit like your experience with rice flour. More of a 'cakey' texture

    mais de 3 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice Hi Flora! Actually, I did not get to try them with other flours besides tapioca yet! Thanks for reminding me - the first time I made this recipe it was so good, so I'd love to eat pao de queijo again. I have a feeling that potato starch might work okay. Will report soon ;)

    mais de 3 anos atrás
  • Felice

    Felice Just made these with Potato starch/katakuriko yesterday and it worked great! Posted the photo above ;)

    mais de 3 anos atrás
Comment_tail